Possible Insight

Quest for Insurance Part I: The Search

with 5 comments

As you may recall, I previously posted about my recommendations for fixing health care (Part I, Part II, Part III). Recently, I had to navigate the current system and thought I’d share my experience in the context of those recommendations. You see, COBRA ran out on my health insurance from the last startup I founded and the new one hasn’t set up a company health plan yet. Thus I had the, um, “pleasure” of trying to obtain individual coverage.

I started by going to eHealthInsurance and hitting up the big three companies: Aetna, Anthem (BlueShield/BlueCross), and HealthNet. My first disappointment came when I discovered that there is no universal application. You have to type in roughly the same information in substantially different formats for each company. What value exactly is eHealthInsurance adding here?

My second disappointment came when they all rejected the applications for different reasons. There are four people in our family. One of them was rejected by two companies, two of them were rejected by one company, one of them was not rejected at all. The reasons were allergy shots, acne, possible acne, and being underweight. The first two are minor ongoing issues.  Considering we were applying for $10K deductible plans with no office visit or prescription coverage, it’s hard to see what the problem is. The second one was unconfirmed by the first doctor, totally minor, and subsequently excluded by a second doctor. The last one is the only one that should have been of any concerned and a check with that person’s doctor would have eliminated the concern.

My working hypothesis is that these companies don’t actually want to offer individual health coverage. For regulatory or political reasons, they have to appear to offer such coverage. But unless an individual is so low risk as to be obscenely profitable, why go to the effort? It’s so much easier to focus on selling group coverage to employers.  This is a side effect of the tax deductibility of premiums for most companies but not most individuals.

Luckily, there are niche providers that pursue opportunities that are not attractive to the largest players. One of them is Assurant Health. After filling out the online application at their Web site, I received a call from their underwriting department within two days. They wanted to review the medical records for the two family members receiving allergy shots to make sure these were not indicative of larger issues. No problem, we had signed a release and I had no objection to paying a premium based on actual risk.

Now, the story takes a funny turn. Apparently, HIPAA has made doctors so paranoid about penalties for breaching patient privacy, that they don’t want to give out your medical records to anyone. Despite the general release we signed, two medical clinics wanted us to sign special releases. It took a month to actually get these special releases so we could sign them. Even then, one of the clinics also required us to call them on the phone and give them verbal permission as well. Government intervention strikes again! If the government had clearly specified the mechanism for releasing medical records, there wouldn’t have been a problem. Even better, if the government hadn’t distorted the market for insurance toward employer-sponsored coverage, this transaction would be so routine that the free market would have solved the problem

The story has a happy ending.  In Part II, I will analyze the excellent coverage we got from Assurant in the context of my previous recommendations.

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Written by Kevin

January 14, 2010 at 4:17 pm

5 Responses

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  1. Hey Kevin –

    I agree with you that the companies don’t really want to sell insurance. They will use any type of pre-existing condition (like acne) to deny coverage.

    But, once you’ve been rejected from anthem blue cross/blue shield, you can apply for California’s MRMIP program. Once accepted into the program, you can choose from a few options, including anthem blue cross/blue shield PPO or the cheaper HMO programs.

    http://www.mrmib.ca.gov/MRMIB/MRMIP.shtml

    Daniel Horowitz

    January 14, 2010 at 10:11 pm

    • Yeah, I know. That was potentially my next move. But as you’ll see, I’m happy with what I got from Assurant. It’s actually better than Anthem for my purposes.

      kevindick

      January 15, 2010 at 12:10 am

  2. I’ve maintained my professional membership with IEEE, in part, so that I can return to their group plan if need be.

    John Wallace

    January 19, 2010 at 12:22 pm

  3. […] Comments Art of Pop on Investing in SuperstarsJohn Wallace on Quest for Insurance Part I: The Searchcooper on Investing in Superstarsleslie speakers on Why You Should Be A SkepticDan Stocker on […]

  4. […] trials chronicled in Part I have a happy ending.  I eventually obtained an excellent individual plan from Assurant Health. I […]


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